New Study Suggests That A High Fat/Low Carb Diet May Help To Prevent Cognitive Ability Decline

Preventing cognitive decline is something that is very important to an aging population. In a current News 18 article, it is reported that a ketogenic diet can help to prevent a decline in peoples’ cognitive abilities. A ketogenic diet consists of foods that contain few carbohydrates and are rich in fats.

A scientific team from the University of Kentucky recently took part in a study that looked at how the stomachs and brains of humans are more correlated than was previously known. A total of 18 Laboratory mice were used in the study, with half of the mice receiving a regular diet and the other half receiving a ketogenic diet.

A spokesperson from the University of Kentucky said that new scientific findings suggest that brain activity may be working in tandem with existing stomach bacteria. With their recent study, the scientific team was trying to determine if a ketogenic diet can produce healthy brain activity, while reducing the incidence of cognitive degeneration.

After approximately four months of study, the team found that the mice that ate the ketogenic foods showed some positive and beneficial results. These mice had lower body weight, lower glucose levels and increased flow of blood to the brain. According to one of the team members, blood flow to the brain and healthy blood-brain barrier function can greatly affect a person’s cognitive abilities.

Another important finding from the study is that the mice on the ketogenic diet were better able to clear the brain of Alzheimer’s-related amyloid-beta.

The scientific team was happy with their findings, which indicate that certain diets may actually be used to lower one’s risk of developing cognitive decline. The team also learned that if either the brain or stomach are in disorder, the other organ will likewise be operating at a less-than-optimum level.

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About the Author: BJ Hetherington

BJ is the lead editor of Meical Daily Times. Fluent in French and proficient in Spanish and Arabic, he focuses on diseases and conditions. BJ is a graduate of York University In Toronto. When BJ isn't busy writing his next piece, he can often be found running the streets of the GTA.

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