How To Fight The Winter Blues

It can be a lot harder to get out of the bed when it is cold and snowy outside. The winter weather can cause anyone to feel drained. However, many people suffer from a more serious condition that is known as seasonal affective disorder or SAD. Neeraj Gandrota is the chief medical officer at Delphi Behavioral Health Group.

Neeraj stated that people who have SAD have the same symptoms as people who suffer from clinical depression. However, people who have SAD notice that their symptoms are more severe during the winter months.

SAD often occurs as the result of the lack of sunshine. If there is less sunshine, then your body will not produce as much vitamin D. It is estimated that 6 percent of the population has SAD. Fourteen percent of people suffer from the winter blues, which is a milder version of SAD.

Women are more likely to develop SAD than men. Some of the symptoms of SAD include fatigue, weight loss or gain, depression, hopelessness and not finding pleasure in the activities that you once enjoyed. Even though most people have SAD during the winter, a small percentage of people have it during the spring and summer months.

There are several ways that you can treat SAD. The best thing that you can do is get outside and get some more sunshine. You should also exercise. You can keep your cortisol level in check by exercising. Cortisol is one of the body’s stress hormones. You can also take vitamin D supplements.

If you are unable to fight SAD on your own, then you may be a candidate for light therapy. It mimics the natural sunlight. Most people are able to see results from light therapy within one to four weeks. You should see your doctor if nothing else helps. You may actually have clinical depression instead of SAD if your symptoms do not improve.

Link to full article: https://www.shape.com/lifestyle/mind-and-body/how-know-you-have-seasonal-affective-disorder-sad

Recommended For You

mm

About the Author: BJ Hetherington

BJ is the lead editor of Meical Daily Times. Fluent in French and proficient in Spanish and Arabic, he focuses on diseases and conditions. BJ is a graduate of York University In Toronto. When BJ isn't busy writing his next piece, he can often be found running the streets of the GTA.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *