Phage Therapy Saves Lives When Antibiotics Fail

The invention of antibiotics many years ago was hailed as a miracle drug. The truth is that we’ve used antibiotics in so many cases, that we have created mutant super-bugs which are capable of surviving even the harshest antibiotics. With so many antibiotics unable to treat cases, many physicians are left with no choice but to look at alternative methods of treatment.

The scary truth of superbugs is that by 2050, 10 million are expected to die from drug-resistant bacteria infections. This could mean a lethal paper cut or needle prick which is untreatable with antibiotics. Unfortunately, new antibiotics aren’t being developed fast enough to be able to treat all of the new strains of bacteria which arise.

In one case, a Phage Virus was used to successfully treat a 25-year-old Cystic Fibrosis patient with a drug-resistant antibiotic. A scientist named Steffanie Strathdee was able to obtain a phage virus that successfully destroyed the phage bacteria infection. The truth is that many people aren’t aware of the potential danger that phage bacteria can cause to the human body. Phage treatments require special approval, and it’s extremely rare that a patient is treated with a phage virus.

Phage viruses are known for attacking a specific kind of bacteria, and are designed to provide the personalized approach that is targeted. These bacteriophage treatments are not new, as they were first discovered in 1915 and used in the 1920s/1930s. Doctors were skeptical, and the discovery of antibiotics led support away from the use of phage bacteria to the use of drug-based treatments.

The aim among medical scientists with these bacteriophages is to run clinical trials in order to prove their value. Upon FDA approval, it is expected that the use of bacteriophages for the treatment of bacterial infections will become a convenient alternative to the current antibiotics on the market now.

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About the Author: BJ Hetherington

BJ is the lead editor of Meical Daily Times. Fluent in French and proficient in Spanish and Arabic, he focuses on diseases and conditions. BJ is a graduate of York University In Toronto. When BJ isn't busy writing his next piece, he can often be found running the streets of the GTA.

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